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Publications 

IHRNASS Turkey ReportScientists, Engineers, and Medical Doctors in Turkey: A Human Rights Mission (2013)
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This report to the International Human Rights Network of Academies and Scholarly Societies was written by Carol Corillon, Peter Diamond, and Hans-Peter Zenner following a February 2013 human rights mission to Turkey. The mission included visits to Sincan high security prison outside the capital, Ankara, and Silivri high security prison, about a two-hour drive from Istanbul. The report describes four enormous and highly-irregular political trials held before the otherwise defunct “High Criminal Courts."    

 

 

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International Human Rights Network of Academies and Scholarly Societies: Proceedings - Symposium and Seventh Biennial Meeting, London, May 18-20, 2005 (2006)
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This report is the proceedings of the seventh biennial meeting of the International Human Rights Network of Academies and Scholarly Societies. (The international Network, created in 1993, consists of 70 national academies and scholarly societies around the world that work to address serious science and human rights issues of mutual concern. The Committee on Human Rights of the U.S. National Academies serves as the Network’s secretariat.) The meeting was held on May 18 and 20, 2005, at the Royal Society in London. The main events of the meeting were a semipublic symposium, entitled Scientists, Human Rights, and Prospects for the Future, and a workshop on a variety of topics related to science, engineering, and health in the human rights context. 

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International Human Rights Network of Academies and Scholarly Societies: Proceedings - Symposium and Fifth Biennial Meeting, Paris, May 10-11, 2001 (2003)
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This report is the proceedings of the fifth biennial meeting of the International Human Rights Network of Academies and Scholarly Societies. (The international Network, created in 1993, consists of 70 national academies and scholarly societies around the world that work to address serious science and human rights issues of mutual concern. The Committee on Human Rights of the U.S. National Academies serves as the Network’s secretariat.) The meeting was held on May 10 and 11, 2001, at the Palais de l’Institut de France in Paris. The main events of the meeting were a semipublic symposium, entitled Human Rights and the Scientific Community, and a workshop on a variety of topics related to science, engineering, and health in the human rights context.   

cover imageGuatemala: Human Rights and the Myrna Mack Case (2003)
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Two members of the Committee on Human Rights (CHR), NAS member Mary Jane West-Eberhard and NAS/NAE member Morton Panish, undertook a mission to Guatemala to observe the trial of two high-level Guatemalan military officials who were charged with ordering the murder of Guatemalan anthropologist Myrna Mack. She was stabbed to death in 1990, two days after a report for which she was principal researcher, “Assistance and Control: Policies Toward Internally Displaced Populations in Guatemala,” was published by the Georgetown University Press. Ms. Mack had been doing research on and writing about the unjust treatment of the internally displaced people in Guatemala. Thirteen years after Ms. Mack’s murder—after the case had gone through dozens of courts and countless delays—a general and colonel in the Guatemalan military intelligence apparatus were brought to trial, and one was convicted. This marked the first time in Guatemalan history that a high-level military official had been brought to justice for atrocities he committed during Guatemala’s 30-year civil war. This report summarizes the one-month trial proceedings. 

Report on the Case of Dr. Saad Eddin Mohamed Ibrahim, Imprisoned Sociologist, Cairo, Egypt (2001)
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In February 2001 Committee on Human Rights (CHR) member Morton Panish (a member of the NAS and NAE) and former National Academies staff officer Jay Davenport attended the February 2001 hearings in Cairo of the trial of renowned sociology professor, Saad Eddin Ibrahim. This report provides a summary of the February trial cycle and developments in Dr. Ibrahim s case from the time of his arrest in June 2000 through the end of May 2001, when he and 27 staff members of the Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies (which he directs) were convicted. It also describes the CHR s efforts in behalf of Professor Ibrahim and provides an overview of the political and legal environment in Egypt at the time. The report concludes that the outlook for the development of a healthy civil society in Egypt appears to be growing dimmer. By prosecuting a person as highly esteemed as Dr. Ibrahim and closing the Ibn Khaldun Center , the government was sending a clear message that there will be little tolerance of those working in Egypt to promote democracy and the growth of civil society there.

The Myrna Mack Case: An Update (1998)
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In 1992 the Committee on Human Rights undertook a fact-finding mission to Guatemala.The committees' report, Scientists and Human Rights in Guatemala (1992), describes the mission and its findings. It focuses especially on the September 11, 1990, murder of anthropologist Myrna Elizabeth Mack Chang. Myrna Mack researched and wrote about indigenous populations displaced or destroyed due to armed political-military conflict and military counterinsurgency practices.  She was murdered outside her workplace in Guatemala City only two days after her research was published in English. This update provides a synopsis of the Myrna Mack case through 1997, with an overview and a descriptive chronology of the primary legal steps taken to prosecute the three military officers accused of ordering Myrna Mack's murder.

Scientists and Human Rights in Syria

Scientists and Human Rights in Syria (1993)
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The prolonged detention on political grounds of so many Syrian colleagues in the science and health fields has been of long-standing concern to the committee. Although recent amnesties announced by the Syrian government have freed more than 3,500 political detainees, no lists of those released have been published. Because of this lack of information and because of the secretive manner in which human rights cases are handled by the Syrian government, it has been impossible to confirm exactly how many of the 287 persons whose cases have been undertaken by the Committee on Human Rights have been freed; our sources indicate that at least 49 are no longer incarcerated. The Committee on Human Rights published this report to urge the Syrian government to give an accounting of those who have been released and those who remain in detention.

 

Scientists and Human Rights in Guatemala: Report of a Delegation (1992)
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Roughly 40 thousand people have been killed or made to "disappear" for political reasons in Guatemala during the last 30 years. Despite vows and some genuine efforts by the current government, human rights abuses and political killings continue. Scientists and Human Rights in Guatemala presents a history of the violence and the research findings and conclusions of a 1992 delegation to Guatemala. The focus of the book is on the human rights concerns and the responses of the government and military authorities to those concerns. Background and status of an investigation into the political murder of an eminent Guatemalan anthropologist is presented along with an overview of the impact of the repression on universities, research institutions, and service and human rights organizations. 

 

 Science and Human Rights (1988)
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 In April 1987, the Committee on Human Rights presented a symposium on science and human rights to the entire National Academy of Sciences’ membership, their guests, and the public. The three speakers at the symposium are all individuals whose cases were undertaken by the committee when they were imprisoned (Juan Luis Gonzalez, Chile; Ismail Mohamed, South Africa; Yuri Orlov, Soviet Union). The symposium is a reflection of the international solidarity of scientists. The theme reflected in many of the presentations is that of the scientist’s responsibility to his colleagues and the consequent moral support and inner strength derived by those who are victims of abuse. We hope that this publication will inspire those who read it, as the symposium on science and human rights inspired those who attended it, to speak out against abuses of human rights whenever and wherever they occur. 

 

 Scientists and Human Rights in Somalia (1988)
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This report presents information gathered by Francisco J. Ayala, Carol Corillon, M. Alfred Haynes, and Lawrence R. Klein, members of a human rights delegation to Somalia from October 25 through November 1, 1987. The delegates went to Somalia to gather information and express the concerns of the Committee on Human Rights regarding eleven imprisoned scientific colleagues and in the hope of visiting them in prison. The report was published with the hope that it would bring the plight of these individuals, and of many other prisoners of conscience in Somalia, to the attention of the authorities in Somalia and concerned individuals everywhere so that immediate action would be taken toward their release.


 Scientists and Human Rights in Chile: Report of a Delegation (1985)
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This report presents information gathered by Baruch Blumberg, Carol Corillon, Gerard Debreu, and Eric Stover, members of the delegation that was sent to Chile by the Committee on Human Rights in March 1985. Following a November 1984 declaration of a state of siege by the Chilean government, reports of violations of human rights in Chile began to increase significantly. The Committee on Human Rights was particularly concerned with reports that security forced had detained several scientists, engineers, and medical professionals, held them in incommunicado detention, and subsequently banished them to small villages in remote areas of the country. These disturbing reports of new violations of human rights in Chile were added to the committee’s long-standing concerns about colleagues reported to have “disappeared” since 1973 and whose cases had never been resolved.