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Right to Science


Resources on the nature and scope of the right to science


Advancing Rights and Freedoms Banner Virtual

 
 

Many scientists awarded the Nobel Prize have, in their personal and professional lives, made significant contributions to the realization of human rights. This exhibition, presented by the Committee on Human Rights of the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in cooperation with Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences, celebrates those contributions. It highlights some of the many efforts by Nobel Laureates to promote and protect rights recognized in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international human rights treaties.

Featuring portraits of selected Laureates and brief abstracts chronicling their human rights achievements, the exhibit honors Laureates in the sciences, together with members of the scientific community who have received the Nobel Peace Prize. The activities highlighted in this exhibit, which range from Denis Mukwege’s work to provide medical care for survivors of sexual violence to Yuan T. Lee’s efforts to call attention to the human rights implications of climate change, demonstrate the profound and enduring connections between science and human rights and the important role for science in advancing human dignity worldwide.

 

 

Advancing Rights and Freedom Cover

You can also learn about the significant contributions
Nobel Laureates have made in support of human rights by viewing the exhibit booklet.
   

 
We invite you to explore the exhibit through a virtual gallery tour

 

Virtual Gallery Tour
 
The virtual tour offers a 360-degree view of the NAS East Gallery, where the exhibit was displayed in 2020, and allows visitors to zoom in on each image. Visitors can read each photograph's accompanying information by clicking on the corresponding blue dot.