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Title of Law:National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010
Law #:Public Law 111- 84
Passed by Congress:111th Congress (1st Session)

The following are excerpts, highlighted in red, from the final legislation and/or conference report which contain references to and studies for The National Academies. (Pound signs [##] between passages denote the deletion of unrelated text.)

HR2647 Skelton (D-Mo.) 10/22/09
Enrolled (finally passed both houses)
To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2010 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.
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SEC. 596. COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ON PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS AND DISPOSITION OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE OFFENDERS IN THE ARMED FORCES.

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(a) Review and Assessment of Current Capabilities.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretaries of the military departments, shall conduct a comprehensive review of the following:

(A) The programs and activities of the Department of Defense for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders in members of the Armed Forces.

(B) The policies of the Department of Defense relating to the disposition of substance abuse offenders in the Armed Forces, including disciplinary action and administrative separation.

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(c) Independent Report on Substance Use Disorders Programs for Members of the Armed Forces.—

(1) STUDY REQUIRED.—Upon completion of the policy review required by subsection (a), the Secretary of Defense shall provide for a study on substance use disorders programs for members of the Armed Forces to be conducted by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences or such other independent entity as the Secretary shall select for purposes of the study.

(2) ELEMENTS.—The study required by paragraph (1) shall include a review and assessment of the following:

(A) The adequacy and appropriateness of protocols for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of substance use disorders in members of the Armed Forces.

(B) The adequacy of the availability of and access to care for substance use disorders in military medical treatment facilities and under the TRICARE program.

(C) The adequacy and appropriateness of current credentials and other requirements for physician and non-physician healthcare professionals treating members of the Armed Forces with substance use disorders.

(D) The advisable ratio of physician and non-physician care providers for substance use disorders to members of the Armed Forces with such disorders.

(E) The adequacy of the availability of and access to care for substance use disorders for members of the reserve components of the Armed Forces when compared with the availability of and access to care for substance use disorders for members of the regular components of the Armed Forces.

(F) The adequacy of the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of substance use disorders programs for dependents of members of the Armed Forces, whether such dependents suffer from their own substance use disorder or because of the substance use disorder of a member of the Armed Forces.

(G) Such other matters as the Secretary considers appropriate for purposes of the study.

(3) REPORT.—Not later than two years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the entity conducting the study required by paragraph (1) shall submit to the Secretary of Defense and the congressional defense committees a report on the results of the study. The report shall set forth the findings and recommendations of the entity as a result of the study.

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SEC. 726. INDEPENDENT STUDY ON POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER EFFORTS.

(a) Study Required.—The Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, shall provide for a study on the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder to be conducted by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences or such other independent entity as the Secretary shall select for purposes of the study.

(b) Elements.—The study required by subsection (a) shall include the following:

(1) A list of each operative program and method available for the prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, or rehabilitation of post-traumatic stress disorder, including—

(A) the rates of success for each such program or method (including an operational definition of the term “success” and a discussion of the process used to quantify such rates);

(B) based on the incidence of actual diagnoses, an estimate of the number of members of the Armed Forces and veterans diagnosed by the Department of Defense or the Department of Veterans Affairs as having post-traumatic stress disorder and the number of such veterans who have been successfully treated; and

(C) any collaborative efforts between the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs to prevent, screen, diagnose, treat, or rehabilitate post-traumatic stress disorder.

(2) The status of studies and clinical trials involving innovative treatments of post-traumatic stress disorder that are conducted by the Department of Defense, the Department of Veterans Affairs, or the private sector, including—

(A) efforts to identify physiological markers of post-traumatic stress disorder;

(B) with respect to efforts to determine causation of post-traumatic stress disorder, brain imaging studies and the correlation between brain region physiology and post-traumatic stress disorder diagnoses and the results (including any interim results) of such efforts;

(C) the effectiveness of alternative therapies in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, including the therapeutic use of animals;

(D) the effectiveness of administering pharmaceutical agents before, during, or after a traumatic event in the prevention and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder; and

(E) identification of areas in which the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs may be duplicating studies, programs, or research with respect to post-traumatic stress disorder.

(3) A description of each treatment program for post-traumatic stress disorder, including a comparison of the methods of treatment by each program, at the following locations:

(A) Fort Hood, Texas.

(B) Fort Bliss, Texas.

(C) Fort Campbell, Tennessee.

(D) Other locations the entity conducting the study considers appropriate.

(4) The respective current and projected future annual expenditures by the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs for the treatment and rehabilitation of post-traumatic stress disorder.

(5) A description of gender-specific and racial and ethnic group-specific mental health treatment and services available for members of the Armed Forces, including—

(A) the availability of such treatment and services;

(B) the access to such treatment and services;

(C) the need for such treatment and services; and

(D) the efficacy and adequacy of such treatment and services.

(6) A description of areas for expanded future research with respect to post-traumatic stress disorder.

(7) Any other matters the Secretary of Defense and Secretary of Veterans Affairs consider relevant with respect to the purposes of obtaining a comprehensive scientific assessment of—

(A) the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder among members of the Armed Forces and veterans;

(B) the availability and effectiveness of various treatment programs and methods available for post-traumatic stress disorder;

(C) the current and future projected costs of such treatment programs and methods; or

(D) additional areas of needed research.

(8) Any other matters the entity conducting the study considers relevant.

(c) Reports.—

(1) INITIAL REPORT.—Not later than July 1, 2012, the entity conducting the study required by subsection (a) shall submit to the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and the appropriate committees a report on the study.

(2) RESPONSE.—Not later than January 1, 2013, the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall each submit to the appropriate committees a response to the report submitted under paragraph (1), including any recommendations on the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder based on such report.

(d) Updated Reports Required.—

(1) UPDATED REPORT.—Not later than July 1, 2014, the entity conducting the study required by subsection (a) shall submit to the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and the appropriate committees an update of the report required by subsection (c).

(2) UPDATED RESPONSE.—Not later than January 1, 2015, the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall each submit to the appropriate committees a response to the updated report submitted under paragraph (1), including any recommendations on the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder based on such updated report.

(e) Appropriate Committees Defined.—In this section, the term “appropriate committees” means—

(1) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives; and

(2) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.

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SEC. 1077. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS USE OF SERVICE DOGS FOR THE TREATMENT OR REHABILITATION OF VETERANS WITH PHYSICAL OR MENTAL INJURIES OR DISABILITIES.

(a) Program Required.—Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall commence a three-year study to assess the benefits, feasibility, and advisability of using service dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of veterans with physical or mental injuries or disabilities, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

(b) Partnerships.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall carry out the study by partnering with nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations that—

(A) would not charge veterans who participate in the study fees for the dogs, services, or lodging that they provide; and

(B) are accredited by, or adhere to standards comparable to those of, an accrediting organization with demonstrated experience, national scope, and recognized leadership and expertise in the training of service dogs and education in the use of service dogs.

(2) REIMBURSEMENT OF COSTS.—The Secretary shall reimburse partners $10,000 for each dog provided to a veteran who enrolls in the study and successfully completes a training program offered by one of the partners.

(c) Participation.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—As part of the study, the Secretary shall, subject to paragraph (2), arrange for the provision of a service dog to the greater of the following:

(A) 200 veterans.

(B) A sufficient number of such veterans to produce scientifically valid results with respect to assessing the benefits and costs of the use of such dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of such veterans.

(2) NUMBER OF VETERANS.—The Department of Veterans Affairs may provide dogs to fewer than 200 veterans if, despite its sustained and repeated efforts, it is unable to recruit 200 veterans to participate in the study referred to in subsection (d).

(3) ELIGIBLE VETERANS.—A veteran is eligible to enroll and participate in the study on an ongoing basis if:

(A) The veteran has physical disabilities (other than blindness or hearing impairment) or mental injuries or disabilities.

(B) A Department of Veterans Affairs provider determines, based on clinical evaluation of efficacy, that the veteran is an appropriate candidate for the study and may potentially benefit from a service dog.

(C) The veteran agrees to successfully complete a training program arranged by the Department of Veterans Affairs and offered by a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that is accredited by, or adheres to standards comparable to those of, an accrediting organization with demonstrated experience, national scope, and recognized leadership and expertise in the training of service dogs and education in the use of service dogs.

(4) COMPOSITION.—The Secretary shall ensure that at least half of the participants in the study are veterans who suffer primarily from a mental health injury or disability.

(5) AUTHORIZED BENEFITS.—The Department of Veterans Affairs will provide to a veteran participating in this study:

(A) Veterinary treatment to maintain the health of the dog and keep it functioning in its prescribed role.

(B) Hardware required by the dog to perform its tasks, and repairs to such hardware.

(C) Payments and allowances for travel incurred in becoming adjusted to the service dogs, to be paid in the same manner that payments and allowances are authorized under section 111 of title 38, United States Code, and its implementing regulations.

(6) ADDITIONAL BENEFIT FOR ASSOCIATED EXPENSES.—As an incentive for participation in the study, veterans participating in the study will receive from the Department of Veterans Affairs a monthly payment of $75 to offset costs associated with the dog in addition to those identified in paragraph (5), such as services not prescribed or performed by a veterinarian, including but not limited to, license tags (if required), food, grooming, nail trimming, boarding, and over-the-counter medications.

(7) OPTION FOR OWNERSHIP OF, AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR, THE DOG AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THE STUDY.—At the end of the study the veteran will have the option of ownership of the dog. If the veteran does not wish to retain the dog, the 501(c)(3) organization that provided the dog will be responsible for caring for or appropriately placing the dog. In any case after completion of the study, or if and when the veteran chooses to not participate in the study until completion, further responsibility by the Department of Veterans Affairs for any benefits in this provision will cease. Further, the Department of Veterans Affairs’ liability related to the dog will cease.

(d) Study.—The Secretary shall conduct a scientifically valid research study of the costs and benefits associated with the use of service dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of veterans with physical or mental injuries or disabilities. The matters studied shall include the following:

(1) The therapeutic benefits to such veterans, including the quality of life benefits reported by the veterans partaking in the study.

(2) The economic benefits of using service dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of such veterans, including—

(A) savings on health care costs, including savings related to reductions in hospitalization and reductions in the use of prescription drugs; and

(B) productivity and employment gains for the veterans.

(e) Reports.—

(1) ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY.—After each year of the study, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the findings of the Secretary with respect to the study.

(2) FINAL REPORT BY THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the completion of the study, the National Academy of Sciences shall submit to Congress a report on the results of the study.

(f) Funding.—The study under this section is subject to the availability of appropriations provided to the Department of Veterans Affairs for such purpose.

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SEC. 1304. METRICS FOR THE COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

(a) Metrics Required.—The Secretary of Defense shall develop and implement metrics to measure the impact and effectiveness of activities of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense to address threats arising from the proliferation of chemical, nuclear, and biological weapons and weapons-related materials, technologies, and expertise.

(b) Secretary of Defense Report on Metrics.—Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report describing the metrics developed and implemented under subsection (a).

(c) National Academy of Sciences Assessment and Report on Metrics.—

(1) ASSESSMENT.—Not later than 30 days after the date on which the report is submitted by the Secretary of Defense under subsection (b), the Secretary shall enter into an arrangement with the National Academy of Sciences under which the Academy shall carry out an assessment to review the metrics developed and implemented under subsection (a) and identify possible additional or alternative metrics, if necessary.

(2) REPORT.—The National Academy of Sciences shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and the Secretary of Defense a report on the results of the assessment carried out under paragraph (1).

(3) SECRETARY OF DEFENSE REPORT.—

(A) Not later than 90 days after receipt of the report required by paragraph (2), the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the assessment carried out by the National Academy of Sciences.

(B) The report under subparagraph (A) shall include the following:

(i) A summary of the results of the assessment carried out under paragraph (1).

(ii) An evaluation by the Secretary of the assessment.

(iii) A statement of the actions, if any, to be undertaken by the Secretary to implement any recommendations in the assessment.

(C) The report under subparagraph (A) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

(d) Funding.—Of the amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations in section 301(20) or otherwise made available for Cooperative Threat Reduction Programs for fiscal year 2010, not more than $1,000,000 may be obligated or expended to carry out paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (c).

(e) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.—In this section, the term “appropriate congressional committees” means—

(1) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and

(2) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

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TITLE XXXI—DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS

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SUBTITLE C—REPORTS

Sec. 3131. National Academy of Sciences review of national security laboratories.

Sec. 3132. Plan to ensure capability to monitor, analyze, and evaluate foreign nuclear weapons activities.

Sec. 3133. Comptroller General study of stockpile stewardship program.

Sec. 3134. Comptroller General of the United States review of projects carried out by the Office of Environmental Management of the Department of Energy pursuant to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

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SEC. 3131. NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES REVIEW OF NATIONAL SECURITY LABORATORIES.

(a) In General.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Energy shall enter into an agreement with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study of the following laboratories:

(1) The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California.

(2) The Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico.

(3) The Sandia National Laboratories, California and New Mexico.

(b) Elements.—The study required under subsection (a) shall include, with respect to each laboratory specified in such subsection, an evaluation of the following:

(1) The quality of the scientific research being conducted at the laboratory, including research with respect to weapons science, nonproliferation, energy, and basic science.

(2) The quality of the engineering being conducted at the laboratory.

(3) The criteria used to assess the quality of scientific research and engineering being conducted at the laboratory.

(4) The relationship between the quality of the science and engineering at the laboratory and the contract for managing and operating the laboratory.

(5) The management of work conducted by the laboratory for entities other than the Department of Energy, including academic institutions and other Federal agencies, and interactions between the laboratory and such entities.

(c) Cooperation.—The Secretary of Energy shall, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence, ensure that the National Academy of Sciences receives full and timely cooperation from the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the intelligence community (as that term is defined in section 3(4) of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 401a(4))) in conducting the study required under subsection (a).

(d) Report.—The National Academy of Sciences shall submit to the Secretary of Energy a report containing the results of the study and any recommendations resulting from the study.

(e) Submittal to Congress.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than January 1, 2011, the Secretary of Energy shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees the report submitted under subsection (d) and any comments or recommendations of the Secretary with respect to that report.

(2) FORM.—The report shall be submitted to the appropriate congressional committees in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

(f) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.—In this section, the term “appropriate congressional committees” means the following:

(1) The Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the Committee on Science and Technology of the House of Representatives.

(2) The Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate.

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SEC. 3144. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON PRODUCTION OF MOLYBDENUM-99.

(a) Findings.—Congress finds the following:

(1) There are fewer than five reactors around the world currently capable of producing molybdenum-99 (in this section referred to as “Mo-99”) and there are no such reactors in the United States that can provide a reliable supply of Mo-99 to meet medical needs.

(2) Since November 2007, there have been major disruptions in the global availability of Mo-99, including at facilities in Canada and the Netherlands, which have led to shortages of Mo-99-based medical products in the United States and around the world.

(3) Ensuring a reliable supply of medical radioisotopes, including Mo-99, is of great importance to the public health.

(4) It is also a national security priority of the United States, and specifically of the Department of Energy, to encourage the production of low-enriched uranium-based radioisotopes in order to promote a more peaceful international nuclear order.

(5) The National Academy of Sciences has identified a need to establish a reliable capability in the United States for the production of Mo-99 and its derivatives for medical purposes using low-enriched uranium.

(6) There also exists a capable industrial base in the United States that can support the development of Mo-99 production facilities and can conduct the processing and distribution of radiopharmaceutical products for use in medical tests worldwide.

(b) Sense of Congress.—It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals, including Mo-99 and its derivatives, are essential components of medical tests that help diagnose and treat life-threatening diseases affecting millions of people each year; and

(2) the Secretary of Energy should continue and expand a program to meet the need identified by the National Academy of Sciences to ensure a source of Mo-99 and its derivatives for use in medical tests to help ensure the health security of the United States and around the world and promote peaceful nuclear industries through the use of low-enriched uranium.

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HRpt 111-288 - To accompany H.R. 2627 – To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2010 for military activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel strengths for fiscal year 2010, and for other purposes
Conference Committee
(10/07/09)
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Subtitle I—Other Matters

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SEC. 596. COMPREHENSIVE PLAN ON PREVENTION, DIAGNOSIS, AND TREATMENT OF SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS AND DISPOSITION OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE OFFENDERS IN THE ARMED FORCES.

(a) Review and Assessment of Current Capabilities.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretaries of the military departments, shall conduct a comprehensive review of the following:

(A) The programs and activities of the Department of Defense for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of substance use disorders in members of the Armed Forces.

(B) The policies of the Department of Defense relating to the disposition of substance abuse offenders in the Armed Forces, including disciplinary action and administrative separation.

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(c) Independent Report on Substance Use Disorders Programs for Members of the Armed Forces.—

(1) STUDY REQUIRED.—Upon completion of the policy review required by subsection (a), the Secretary of Defense shall provide for a study on substance use disorders programs for members of the Armed Forces to be conducted by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences or such other independent entity as the Secretary shall select for purposes of the study.

(2) ELEMENTS.—The study required by paragraph (1) shall include a review and assessment of the following:

(A) The adequacy and appropriateness of protocols for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of substance use disorders in members of the Armed Forces.

(B) The adequacy of the availability of and access to care for substance use disorders in military medical treatment facilities and under the TRICARE program.

(C) The adequacy and appropriateness of current credentials and other requirements for physician and non-physician healthcare professionals treating members of the Armed Forces with substance use disorders.

(D) The advisable ratio of physician and non-physician care providers for substance use disorders to members of the Armed Forces with such disorders.

(E) The adequacy of the availability of and access to care for substance use disorders for members of the reserve components of the Armed Forces when compared with the availability of and access to care for substance use disorders for members of the regular components of the Armed Forces.

(F) The adequacy of the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and management of substance use disorders programs for dependents of members of the Armed Forces, whether such dependents suffer from their own substance use disorder or because of the substance use disorder of a member of the Armed Forces.

(G) Such other matters as the Secretary considers appropriate for purposes of the study.

(3) REPORT.—Not later than two years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the entity conducting the study required by paragraph (1) shall submit to the Secretary of Defense and the congressional defense committees a report on the results of the study. The report shall set forth the findings and recommendations of the entity as a result of the study.

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Subtitle C—Other Matters

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SEC. 726. INDEPENDENT STUDY ON POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER EFFORTS.

(a) Study Required.—The Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, shall provide for a study on the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder to be conducted by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences or such other independent entity as the Secretary shall select for purposes of the study.

(b) Elements.—The study required by subsection (a) shall include the following:

(1) A list of each operative program and method available for the prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, or rehabilitation of post-traumatic stress disorder, including—

(A) the rates of success for each such program or method (including an operational definition of the term “success” and a discussion of the process used to quantify such rates);

(B) based on the incidence of actual diagnoses, an estimate of the number of members of the Armed Forces and veterans diagnosed by the Department of Defense or the Department of Veterans Affairs as having post-traumatic stress disorder and the number of such veterans who have been successfully treated; and

(C) any collaborative efforts between the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs to prevent, screen, diagnose, treat, or rehabilitate post-traumatic stress disorder.

(2) The status of studies and clinical trials involving innovative treatments of post-traumatic stress disorder that are conducted by the Department of Defense, the Department of Veterans Affairs, or the private sector, including—

(A) efforts to identify physiological markers of post-traumatic stress disorder;

(B) with respect to efforts to determine causation of post-traumatic stress disorder, brain imaging studies and the correlation between brain region physiology and post-traumatic stress disorder diagnoses and the results (including any interim results) of such efforts;

(C) the effectiveness of alternative therapies in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, including the therapeutic use of animals;

(D) the effectiveness of administering pharmaceutical agents before, during, or after a traumatic event in the prevention and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder; and

(E) identification of areas in which the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs may be duplicating studies, programs, or research with respect to post-traumatic stress disorder.

(3) A description of each treatment program for post-traumatic stress disorder, including a comparison of the methods of treatment by each program, at the following locations:

(A) Fort Hood, Texas.

(B) Fort Bliss, Texas.

(C) Fort Campbell, Tennessee.

(D) Other locations the entity conducting the study considers appropriate.

(4) The respective current and projected future annual expenditures by the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs for the treatment and rehabilitation of post-traumatic stress disorder.

(5) A description of gender-specific and racial and ethnic group-specific mental health treatment and services available for members of the Armed Forces, including—

(A) the availability of such treatment and services;

(B) the access to such treatment and services;

(C) the need for such treatment and services; and

(D) the efficacy and adequacy of such treatment and services.

(6) A description of areas for expanded future research with respect to post-traumatic stress disorder.

(7) Any other matters the Secretary of Defense and Secretary of Veterans Affairs consider relevant with respect to the purposes of obtaining a comprehensive scientific assessment of—

(A) the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder among members of the Armed Forces and veterans;

(B) the availability and effectiveness of various treatment programs and methods available for post-traumatic stress disorder;

(C) the current and future projected costs of such treatment programs and methods; or

(D) additional areas of needed research.

(8) Any other matters the entity conducting the study considers relevant.

(c) Reports.—

(1) INITIAL REPORT.—Not later than July 1, 2012, the entity conducting the study required by subsection (a) shall submit to the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and the appropriate committees a report on the study.

(2) RESPONSE.—Not later than January 1, 2013, the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall each submit to the appropriate committees a response to the report submitted under paragraph (1), including any recommendations on the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder based on such report.

(d) Updated Reports Required.—

(1) UPDATED REPORT.—Not later than July 1, 2014, the entity conducting the study required by subsection (a) shall submit to the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and the appropriate committees an update of the report required by subsection (c).

(2) UPDATED RESPONSE.—Not later than January 1, 2015, the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall each submit to the appropriate committees a response to the updated report submitted under paragraph (1), including any recommendations on the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder based on such updated report.

(e) Appropriate Committees Defined.—In this section, the term “appropriate committees” means—

(1) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives; and

(2) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.

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SUBTITLE F—OTHER MATTERS

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SEC. 1077. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS USE OF SERVICE DOGS FOR THE TREATMENT OR REHABILITATION OF VETERANS WITH PHYSICAL OR MENTAL INJURIES OR DISABILITIES.

(a) Program Required.—Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall commence a three-year study to assess the benefits, feasibility, and advisability of using service dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of veterans with physical or mental injuries or disabilities, including post-traumatic stress disorder.

(b) Partnerships.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—The Secretary shall carry out the study by partnering with nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations that—

(A) would not charge veterans who participate in the study fees for the dogs, services, or lodging that they provide; and

(B) are accredited by, or adhere to standards comparable to those of, an accrediting organization with demonstrated experience, national scope, and recognized leadership and expertise in the training of service dogs and education in the use of service dogs.

(2) REIMBURSEMENT OF COSTS.—The Secretary shall reimburse partners $10,000 for each dog provided to a veteran who enrolls in the study and successfully completes a training program offered by one of the partners.

(c) Participation.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—As part of the study, the Secretary shall, subject to paragraph (2), arrange for the provision of a service dog to the greater of the following:

(A) 200 veterans.

(B) A sufficient number of such veterans to produce scientifically valid results with respect to assessing the benefits and costs of the use of such dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of such veterans.

(2) NUMBER OF VETERANS.—The Department of Veterans Affairs may provide dogs to fewer than 200 veterans if, despite its sustained and repeated efforts, it is unable to recruit 200 veterans to participate in the study referred to in subsection (d).

(3) ELIGIBLE VETERANS.—A veteran is eligible to enroll and participate in the study on an ongoing basis if:

(A) The veteran has physical disabilities (other than blindness or hearing impairment) or mental injuries or disabilities.

(B) A Department of Veterans Affairs provider determines, based on clinical evaluation of efficacy, that the veteran is an appropriate candidate for the study and may potentially benefit from a service dog.

(C) The veteran agrees to successfully complete a training program arranged by the Department of Veterans Affairs and offered by a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that is accredited by, or adheres to standards comparable to those of, an accrediting organization with demonstrated experience, national scope, and recognized leadership and expertise in the training of service dogs and education in the use of service dogs.

(4) COMPOSITION.—The Secretary shall ensure that at least half of the participants in the study are veterans who suffer primarily from a mental health injury or disability.

(5) AUTHORIZED BENEFITS.—The Department of Veterans Affairs will provide to a veteran participating in this study:

(A) Veterinary treatment to maintain the health of the dog and keep it functioning in its prescribed role.

(B) Hardware required by the dog to perform its tasks, and repairs to such hardware.

(C) Payments and allowances for travel incurred in becoming adjusted to the service dogs, to be paid in the same manner that payments and allowances are authorized under section 111 of title 38, United States Code, and its implementing regulations.

(6) ADDITIONAL BENEFIT FOR ASSOCIATED EXPENSES.—As an incentive for participation in the study, veterans participating in the study will receive from the Department of Veterans Affairs a monthly payment of $75 to offset costs associated with the dog in addition to those identified in paragraph (5), such as services not prescribed or performed by a veterinarian, including but not limited to, license tags (if required), food, grooming, nail trimming, boarding, and over-the-counter medications.

(7) OPTION FOR OWNERSHIP OF, AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR, THE DOG AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THE STUDY.—At the end of the study the veteran will have the option of ownership of the dog. If the veteran does not wish to retain the dog, the 501(c)(3) organization that provided the dog will be responsible for caring for or appropriately placing the dog. In any case after completion of the study, or if and when the veteran chooses to not participate in the study until completion, further responsibility by the Department of Veterans Affairs for any benefits in this provision will cease. Further, the Department of Veterans Affairs’ liability related to the dog will cease.

(d) Study.—The Secretary shall conduct a scientifically valid research study of the costs and benefits associated with the use of service dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of veterans with physical or mental injuries or disabilities. The matters studied shall include the following:

(1) The therapeutic benefits to such veterans, including the quality of life benefits reported by the veterans partaking in the study.

(2) The economic benefits of using service dogs for the treatment or rehabilitation of such veterans, including—

(A) savings on health care costs, including savings related to reductions in hospitalization and reductions in the use of prescription drugs; and

(B) productivity and employment gains for the veterans.

(e) Reports.—

(1) ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY.—After each year of the study, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the findings of the Secretary with respect to the study.

(2) FINAL REPORT BY THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the completion of the study, the National Academy of Sciences shall submit to Congress a report on the results of the study.

(f) Funding.—The study under this section is subject to the availability of appropriations provided to the Department of Veterans Affairs for such purpose.

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TITLE XIII—COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

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SEC. 1304. METRICS FOR THE COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

(a) Metrics Required.—The Secretary of Defense shall develop and implement metrics to measure the impact and effectiveness of activities of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program of the Department of Defense to address threats arising from the proliferation of chemical, nuclear, and biological weapons and weapons-related materials, technologies, and expertise.

(b) Secretary of Defense Report on Metrics.—Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report describing the metrics developed and implemented under subsection (a).

(c) National Academy of Sciences Assessment and Report on Metrics.—

(1) ASSESSMENT.—Not later than 30 days after the date on which the report is submitted by the Secretary of Defense under subsection (b), the Secretary shall enter into an arrangement with the National Academy of Sciences under which the Academy shall carry out an assessment to review the metrics developed and implemented under subsection (a) and identify possible additional or alternative metrics, if necessary.

(2) REPORT.—The National Academy of Sciences shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and the Secretary of Defense a report on the results of the assessment carried out under paragraph (1).

(3) SECRETARY OF DEFENSE REPORT.—

(A) Not later than 90 days after receipt of the report required by paragraph (2), the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the assessment carried out by the National Academy of Sciences.

(B) The report under subparagraph (A) shall include the following:

(i) A summary of the results of the assessment carried out under paragraph (1).

(ii) An evaluation by the Secretary of the assessment.

(iii) A statement of the actions, if any, to be undertaken by the Secretary to implement any recommendations in the assessment.

(C) The report under subparagraph (A) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

(d) Funding.—Of the amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations in section 301(20) or otherwise made available for Cooperative Threat Reduction Programs for fiscal year 2010, not more than $1,000,000 may be obligated or expended to carry out paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (c).

(e) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.—In this section, the term “appropriate congressional committees” means—

(1) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and

(2) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Appropriations, and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

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DIVISION C—DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

TITLE XXXI—DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS

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Subtitle C—Reports

Sec. 3131. National Academy of Sciences review of national security laboratories.

Sec. 3132. Plan to ensure capability to monitor, analyze, and evaluate foreign nuclear weapons activities.

Sec. 3133. Comptroller General study of stockpile stewardship program.

Sec. 3134. Comptroller General of the United States review of projects carried out by the Office of Environmental Management of the Department of Energy pursuant to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

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SUBTITLE C—REPORTS

SEC. 3131. NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES REVIEW OF NATIONAL SECURITY LABORATORIES.

(a) In General.—Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Energy shall enter into an agreement with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study of the following laboratories:

(1) The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California.

(2) The Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico.

(3) The Sandia National Laboratories, California and New Mexico.

(b) Elements.—The study required under subsection (a) shall include, with respect to each laboratory specified in such subsection, an evaluation of the following:

(1) The quality of the scientific research being conducted at the laboratory, including research with respect to weapons science, nonproliferation, energy, and basic science.

(2) The quality of the engineering being conducted at the laboratory.

(3) The criteria used to assess the quality of scientific research and engineering being conducted at the laboratory.

(4) The relationship between the quality of the science and engineering at the laboratory and the contract for managing and operating the laboratory.

(5) The management of work conducted by the laboratory for entities other than the Department of Energy, including academic institutions and other Federal agencies, and interactions between the laboratory and such entities.

(c) Cooperation.—The Secretary of Energy shall, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence, ensure that the National Academy of Sciences receives full and timely cooperation from the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the intelligence community (as that term is defined in section 3(4) of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 401a(4))) in conducting the study required under subsection (a).

(d) Report.—The National Academy of Sciences shall submit to the Secretary of Energy a report containing the results of the study and any recommendations resulting from the study.

(e) Submittal to Congress.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than January 1, 2011, the Secretary of Energy shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees the report submitted under subsection (d) and any comments or recommendations of the Secretary with respect to that report.

(2) FORM.—The report shall be submitted to the appropriate congressional committees in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

(f) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.—In this section, the term “appropriate congressional committees” means the following:

(1) The Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the Committee on Science and Technology of the House of Representatives.

(2) The Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate.

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SUBTITLE D—OTHER MATTERS

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SEC. 3144. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON PRODUCTION OF MOLYBDENUM-99.

(a) Findings.—Congress finds the following:

(1) There are fewer than five reactors around the world currently capable of producing molybdenum-99 (in this section referred to as “Mo-99”) and there are no such reactors in the United States that can provide a reliable supply of Mo-99 to meet medical needs.

(2) Since November 2007, there have been major disruptions in the global availability of Mo-99, including at facilities in Canada and the Netherlands, which have led to shortages of Mo-99-based medical products in the United States and around the world.

(3) Ensuring a reliable supply of medical radioisotopes, including Mo-99, is of great importance to the public health.

(4) It is also a national security priority of the United States, and specifically of the Department of Energy, to encourage the production of low-enriched uranium-based radioisotopes in order to promote a more peaceful international nuclear order.

(5) The National Academy of Sciences has identified a need to establish a reliable capability in the United States for the production of Mo-99 and its derivatives for medical purposes using low-enriched uranium.

(6) There also exists a capable industrial base in the United States that can support the development of Mo-99 production facilities and can conduct the processing and distribution of radiopharmaceutical products for use in medical tests worldwide.

(b) Sense of Congress.—It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals, including Mo-99 and its derivatives, are essential components of medical tests that help diagnose and treat life-threatening diseases affecting millions of people each year; and

(2) the Secretary of Energy should continue and expand a program to meet the need identified by the National Academy of Sciences to ensure a source of Mo-99 and its derivatives for use in medical tests to help ensure the health security of the United States and around the world and promote peaceful nuclear industries through the use of low-enriched uranium.

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TITLE II—RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

BUDGET ITEMS

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Electromagnetic gun

The budget request included $11.7 million in PE 63004A, $4.1 million in PE 62618A, and $6.4 million in PE 61104A for activities related to the Army’s Electromagnetic (EM) Gun initiative.

The House bill would authorize the budget request for these programs.

The Senate amendment would authorize reductions of $11.5 million in PE 63004A and $2.0 million in PE 62618A for these programs.

The conferees agree to authorize reductions of $11.5 million in PE 63004A and $2.0 million in PE 62618A for these programs. The conferees note that the Army has terminated its program to develop a vehicle-mounted EM gun due to significant questions raised about the technical feasibility of the program. The conferees further note that the Army still has a need to develop advanced lethality capabilities, leveraging technologies and mechanisms such as advanced energetic materials, hypervelocity, and novel penetrators. Therefore, the conferees authorize increases of $2.0 million in PE 62618A and $6.5 million in PE 63004A for advanced lethality research efforts.

The conferees note that the Army’s reassessment of the large planned investments of its limited science and technology resources into the EM gun program and the ultimate termination of the effort was largely based on the independent analyses of the program performed by the JASON scientific advisory board, the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The conferees are concerned that internal Army scientific and technical organizations appear to have been unable to identify and highlight the technical shortfalls in the envisioned program to decision-makers, and further that the Army did not task the National Research Council’s Board on Army Science and Technology to examine the technical feasibility of the program.

The conferees believe that the Army should place a higher priority on robust technical analysis of modernization programs. The difficulties that the EM gun and Future Combat Systems development efforts have encountered can be partially attributed to a lack of independent, technically informed discussion within the Army’s decision making process. The conferees recommend that the Secretary and Chief of Staff of the Army closely examine how they obtain independent technical advice to support technical and programmatic decision-making.

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SUBTITLE C—OTHER MATTERS

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Independent study on post-traumatic stress disorder efforts (sec. 726)

The House bill contained a provision (sec. 711) that would require the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, to submit a report itemizing the current treatments of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), ongoing research, and areas for future exploration.

The Senate amendment contained a provision (sec. 733) that would require the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to jointly submit a report on research related to PTSD.

The Senate recedes with an amendment that would require the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, to provide for a study on the treatment of PTSD to be conducted by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences or another independent entity, and a clarifying amendment.

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SUBTITLE E—OTHER MATTERS

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Extension of authority for Small Business Innovation Research Commercialization Pilot Program (sec. 848)

The Senate amendment contained a provision (sec. 834) that would make permanent the Small Business Innovation Research Commercialization Pilot Program and extend the authority to include projects under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program, as requested by the Department of Defense (DOD).

The House bill contained no similar provision.

The House recedes with an amendment that would limit the period of reauthorization to 1 year and not authorize the expansion of the successful program to include projects under the STTR program.

The conferees note that DOD has viewed this program as a success, and from the limited data available the conferees have seen no evidence to indicate otherwise. Further, the conferees understand that the National Research Council has indicated that “case studies . . . support the view that small businesses, especially less experienced small businesses, value commercialization assistance programs as a forum to present their technologies and gain information on government procurement needs.” The conferees intend to continue to review progress on this pilot program and, if appropriate, expand and reauthorize it in the future.

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TITLE XIII—COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

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Metrics for the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program (sec. 1304)

The House bill contained a provision (sec. 1304) that would require the Secretary of Defense to enter into an arrangement with the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to carry out a study to identify metrics to measure the impact and effectiveness of activities under the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program at the Department of Defense.

The Senate amendment contained no similar provision.

The Senate recedes with an amendment that would direct the Secretary of Defense to develop metrics for the CTR program. Not later than 270 days after enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense is directed to submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees describing the metrics developed and implemented.

Not later than 30 days after the Secretary of Defense submits the metrics report, the Secretary shall enter into an agreement for the NAS to review and assess the metrics report. The NAS shall submit the results of its assessment of the metrics report to the Secretary of Defense and the appropriate congressional committees.

No later than 90 days after receiving the NAS report the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on the assessment carried by the NAS and shall include actions, if any, to be taken by the Secretary to implement any recommendation in the NAS assessment.

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SUBTITLE C—REPORTS

National Academy of Sciences review of national security laboratories (sec. 3131)

The House bill contained a provision (sec. 3121) that would require the Comptroller General to assess the costs associated with the transition to new management and operations (M&O) contracts, which took place at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2006 and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in 2007. A report on the results of the assessment would be due to the congressional defense committees on March 1, 2010.

The Senate amendment contained a provision (sec. 3132) that would direct the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, to appoint an independent panel of experts to conduct a review of the management and operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL).

The conferees agree to include a provision that would direct the Secretary of Energy to enter into a contract with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a study of the three laboratories, LANL, LLNL, and SNL.

The study would include an evaluation for each of the laboratories of the quality of the scientific research and engineering conducted at each lab; the criteria used to assess the quality of the scientific research and engineering; the relationship between the quality of the work and the contract for managing and operating the laboratory; and the management of the work that the laboratories perform for other entities.

There is a growing concern about the ability of the Department of Energy to maintain the overall quality of the scientific research and engineering capability at the three laboratories. This concern was most recently highlighted in the report of the Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States. The conferees believe that an even handed, unbiased assessment of the quality of the scientific research and engineering at each of the three laboratories, with a clear understanding of the criteria used to measure quality and what factors influence quality would be useful in long-term planning for the operations of the laboratories.

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SUBTITLE D—OTHER MATTERS

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Sense of Congress on production of Molybdenum-99 (sec. 3144)

The Senate amendment contained a provision (sec. 3138) that would set forth the sense of Congress that the Secretary of Energy should continue and expand the program to meet the need identified by the National Academy of Sciences for Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) for medical purposes in the United States by developing a source of Mo-99 using low enriched uranium.

The House had no similar provision.

The House recedes.

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